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grown ups
Marian Keyes

Marian Keyes

tuesday, july 7 / 3:00 PM

Marian Keyes is one of the most successful Irish novelists of all time. Though she was brought up in a home where a lot of oral story-telling went on, it never occurred to her that she could write. Instead she studied law and accountancy and finally started writing short stories in 1993 "out of the blue." Though she had no intention of ever writing a novel ("It would take too long") she sent her short stories to a publisher, with a letter saying she'd started work on a novel. The publishers replied, asking to see the novel, and once her panic had subsided, she began to write what subsequently became her first book Watermelon, published in 1995.

To date, the woman who said she'd never write a novel has published 13 of them. All have been bestsellers around the world, with a total of over 30 million of her books sold to date in 33 languages. Anybody Out There won the British Book Awards award for popular fiction and the inaugural Melissa Nathan Prize for Comedy Romance. This Charming Man won the Irish Book Award for popular fiction. Marian's latest book Grown Ups published in hardback and eBook in February 2020. As well as novels she has written short stories, and articles for various magazines and other publications.

Keyes was born in Limerick in 1963, and brought up in Cavan, Cork, Galway and Dublin; she spent her twenties in London, but is now living in Dún Laoghaire with her husband Tony. She includes among her hobbies reading, movies, shoes, handbags and feminism.

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grown ups

Doubleday Canada | June 30, 2020 | 9780385695886

They're a glamorous family, the Caseys. Johnny Casey, his two brothers Ed and Liam, their beautiful, talented wives and all their kids spend a lot of time together—birthday parties, anniversary celebrations, weekends away. And they're a happy family. Johnny's wife, Jessie—who has the most money—insists on it.

Under the surface, though, conditions are murkier. While some people clash, other people like each other far too much…

Still, everything manages to stay under control—that is, until Ed's wife, Cara, gets a concussion and can't keep her thoughts or opinions to herself. One careless remark at Johnny's birthday party, with the entire family present, and Cara starts spilling all their secrets.

As everything unravels, each of the adults finds themselves wondering if it's—finally—the time to grow up.

clay's quilt
a parchment of leavesthe coal tattoo
SilasHouse

Silas house

thursday, july 9 / 5:00 PM

Silas House is the New York Times bestselling author of six novels, one book of creative nonfiction, and three plays. His writing has appeared frequently in the New York Times and has been published in Time, Newsday, Garden & Gun, the Oxford American, and many other places. House is the winner of an E.B. White Award, the Nautilus Award, the Intellectual Freedom Prize from the National Council of Teachers of English, the Storylines Prize from the New York Public Library/NAV Foundation, and many other honors, as well as being longlisted for the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. He teaches at Berea College and in the Spalding University School of Writing.

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clay's quilt

Blair | June 16, 2020 | 9781949467246

In his New York Times best-selling novel Silas House introduced himself as an important voice for Appalachia and, indeed, for the entire rural South. In Clay's Quilt, now a touchstone for his many fans, House takes us to Free Creek, KY, where a motherless young man forges his path to adulthood surrounded by ancient mountains and his blood relatives and adopted kin: his Aunt Easter tied to her faith and foreboding nature; his Uncle Paul, the quilter; the wild girls Evangeline and Alma; and a fiddler whose music calls to Clay's heart. As he struggles to stitch up the void created by his mother's death, Clay pieces together his own life's quilt, all masterfully wrought by House.

Blair brings this novel into a beautiful new paperback edition, along with two other Silas House novels, A Parchment of Leaves, and The Coal Tattoo. The three novels, which share a common setting and some characters are companion novels. They may be read individually, in any order, but collectively, they form a rich tableau of life in rural mountain Kentucky in the last century.

a parchment of leaves

Blair | June 16, 2020 | 9781949467253

In this nationally best-selling novel, A Parchment of Leaves, Silas House produced an iconic story of 1900s rural mountain Kentucky that remains a favorite of his many fans.

On his way to find work in the Redbud Camp, Saul Sullivan encounters a Cherokee girl who is said to possess a beauty that brings death to the men who see her. Saul, however, is irrevocably drawn to Vine the moment he lays eye on her and believes they are meant to be married, over the objections of her mother and his. Despite her misgivings, Saul's mother, Esme, and his brother, Aaron, take to Vine from the moment she comes to God's Creek. In fact, Vine realizes from the start that Aaron's interest in her is far more than brotherly. When Saul must leave Vine behind for a year of work, troubling and violent events follow his departure, and Vine's spirit and her love are put to the ultimate test.

This novel was the winner of the Award for Special Achievement from the Fellowship of Southern Writers and a finalist for the Southern Book Critics Circle Prize.

the coal tattoo

Blair | June 16, 2020 | 9781949467260

The Coal Tattoo takes place in World War II-era rural Kentucky, where twenty-two-year-old Easter and Anneth, her teenaged sister, lose their parents young and now must raise each other. Easter finds her life in the Pentecostal Holiness church and its music, while Anneth dances and drinks in less-than-holy honky-tonks. Will the differences in their young lives and in their very natures tear them apart, or will the bond of the sisters prevail? In lucid prose with an ear for the voice of the sisters' time and place, Silas House brings readers a rich and moving story of coal country.

This novel was named the Appalachian Book of the Year and was a finalist for the Southern Book Critics Circle Prize.

some go home
PeggyNoeStevens
SusanReigler

Peggy Noe Stevens & Susan Reigler

tuesday, july 14 / 5:00 PM
SPECIAL INTERACTIVE MIXOLOGY EVENT!
Join Peggy and Susan for a bourbon tasting and demonstration. Learn how to make an out-of-this-world Old Fashioned and a marvelous Mint Julep.

Peggy Noe Stevens is founder of the Bourbon Women Association and a master bourbon taster. A lifestyle expert, she is also a professional speaker. As a Bourbon Hall of Fame inductee, she has planned hundreds of events globally over the last thirty years, often working with distilleries and master distillers.

Susan Reigler is a former restaurant critic for the Louisville Courier-Journal and a current correspondent for Bourbon+ and American Whiskey magazines. She has also authored or coauthored seven books on bourbon, including Kentucky Bourbon Country: The Essential Travel Guide and The Kentucky Bourbon Cocktail Book.

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which fork do i use with my bourbon?

South Limestone | May 2, 2020 | 9781949669091

During their travels in bourbon country and beyond to conduct tastings and seminars, entertainment experts Peggy Noe Stevens and Susan Reigler often heard the question, "How do I do this in my home?" This book is their definitive answer. Which Fork Do I Use with My Bourbon? offers a step-by-step guide to hosting a successful bourbon-tasting party—complete with recipes, photos, and tips for beginners and experienced aficionados alike.

From decorations to glassware, this one-stop resource will guide readers from the day they mail invitations to the moment they welcome guests through the door. Alongside their favorite snack, entrée, dessert, and cocktail recipes, Stevens and Reigler offer advice on how to set up a bar, arrange tables, and pair recipes. Once readers are ready, Stevens and Reigler move on to advanced pairings for the bourbon foodie and present two innovative examples of tasting parties—a bourbon cocktail soiree and, of course, the traditional Kentucky Derby party. Inspired by the hosting traditions of five Kentucky distilleries, this book promises to motivate bourbon lovers to start their own bourbon-tasting traditions and to expand the expertise of longtime bourbon enthusiasts.

All the Songs We Sing
Lenard d Moore
Jaki Shelton green

Lenard D. Moore (editor)

Thursday, July 16 / 7:00 PM

Lenard D. Moore, internationally-acclaimed poet, anthologist, and professor, is the founder and executive director of the Carolina African American Writers' Collective. His works, including The Geography of Jazz, A Temple Looming, Desert Storm: A Brief History, Forever Home, The Open Eye and others, have been published in more than fifteen countries.

Jaki Shelton Green is the current Poet Laureate of North Carolina. She is the first African American and third woman to hold the honor. She was named an Academy of American Poet Laureate Fellow by the Academy of American Poets. Her books include Breath of the Song, singing a tree into dance, Dead on Arrival, Conjure Blues, and I Want to Undie You.

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All the Songs We Sing

Blair | June 2, 2020 | 9781949467338

North Carolina is home to a dazzling array of African-American writers who have been meeting and working for more than twenty-five years in service to their craft. Together, they form the Carolina African-American Writers' Collective, which celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary with All the Songs We Sing, an anthology of works by members of the collective, edited by its founder and world-renowned poet, Lenard D. Moore.

North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green introduces the anthology, which includes works by Lenard D. Moore, Bridgette A. Lacy, Crystal Simone Smith, Evie Shockley, Camille T. Dungy, Carole Boston Weatherford, and many others. Individually, these poems, stories, and essays have helped these Carolinians voice their experiences. They remind us of our history, insist on change, and gathered together, their chorus amplifies and demands to be heard. These writers have shaped the modern literary landscape of the Carolinas for the last twenty-five years and will continue to influence and inspire African-American writers for generations to come.

the book of last names
Kristin Harmel photo credit Phil Art Studio Reims France

kristin harmel

tuesday, july 21 / 5:00 PM

Kristin Harmel is the international bestselling author of a dozen novels including The Book of Lost NamesThe Winemaker's Wife, The Room on Rue Amélie, and The Sweetness of Forgetting. Her work has been featured in PeopleWoman's Day, Men's Health, and Ladies' Home Journal, among many other media outlets. She lives in Orlando, Florida.

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the book of lost names

Gallery Books | July 21, 2020 | 9781982131890

Eva Traube Abrams, a librarian in Florida, is shelving books one morning when her eyes lock on a photograph in the New York Times. The accompanying article discusses the looting of libraries by the Nazis across Europe during World War II— an experience Eva remembers well—and the search to reunite people with the texts taken from them so long ago. Highlighted is a religious text now housed in Berlin's Zentral- und Landesbibliothek library. It appears to contain some sort of code, though researchers don't know where it came from—or what the code means. But Eva does.

A graduate student in 1942, Eva was forced to flee Paris after the arrest of her father, a Polish Jew. Finding refuge in a small mountain town, she begins forging identity documents for Jewish children fleeing to neutral Switzerland. But erasing people comes with a price, and, along with an enigmatic forger named Rémy, Eva decides she must find a way to preserve the real names of the children who are too young to remember who they really are. The records they keep in The Book of Lost Names will become even more vital when the resistance cell they work for is betrayed.

Sixty years later, seeing the book in the New York Times photograph brings everything rushing back; it's the book Eva believed had vanished forever, the book that held so many secrets, the book that might even hold the last message from Rémy. As the only one who knows what the code means, she must find the strength to revisit old memories and help reunite those lost during the war.

hieroglyphics
Jill McCorkle photo credit Tom Rankin

jill mccorkle

thursday, july 23 / 7:00 PM

Jill McCorkle's first two novels were released simultaneously when she was just out of college, and the New York Times called her "a born novelist." Since then, she has published six novels and four collections of short stories, and her work has appeared in Best American Short Stories several times, as well as The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. Five of her books have been New York Times Notable books, and her most recent novel, Life After Life, was a New York Times bestseller. She has received the New England Booksellers Award, the John Dos Passos Prize for Excellence in Literature, and the North Carolina Award for Literature. She has written for the New York Times Book Review, the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, Garden & Gun, the Atlantic, and other publications. She was a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Fiction at Harvard, where she also chaired the department of creative writing. She is currently a faculty member of the Bennington College Writing Seminars and is affiliated with the MFA program at North Carolina State University.

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hieroglyphics

Algonquin | July 1, 2020 | 9781616209728

A mesmerizing novel about the burden of secrets carried across generations. Lil and Frank married young, launched into courtship when they bonded over how they both—suddenly, tragically— lost a parent when they were children. Over time, their marriage grew and strengthened, with each still wishing for so much more understanding of the parents they'd lost prematurely.

Now, after many years in Boston, they've retired to North Carolina. There, Lil, determined to leave a history for their children, sifts through letters and notes and diary entries— perhaps revealing more secrets than Frank wants their children to know. Meanwhile, Frank has become obsessed with what might have been left behind at the house he lived in as a boy on the outskirts of town, where a young single mother, Shelley, is just trying to raise her son with some sense of normalcy. Frank's repeated visits to Shelley's house begin to trigger memories of her own family, memories that she'd hoped to keep buried. Because, after all, not all parents are ones you wish to remember.

Hieroglyphics reveals the difficulty of ever really knowing the intentions and dreams and secrets of the people who raised you. In her deeply layered and masterful novel, Jill McCorkle deconstructs and reconstructs what it means to be a father or a mother, and what it means to be a child piecing together the world around us, a child learning to make sense of the hieroglyphics of history and memory.

blacktop wasteland
S.A. Cosby

s. a. cosby

tuesday, july 28 / 5:00 PM

Shawn A. Cosby is a writer from Southeastern Virginia, now residing in Gloucester, Virginia. His short fiction has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines. His short story "The Grass Beneath My Feet" won the Anthony Award for best short story in 2019. He is also the author of My Darkest Prayer and Brotherhood of the Blade. His writing is influenced by his experience as a bouncer, construction worker, retail manager and for six hours a mascot for a major fast food chain inside the world's hottest costume. When he isn't crafting tales of murder and mayhem he assists the dedicated staff at J.K. Redmind Funeral home as a mortician's assistant. He is an avid hiker and is also known as one hell of a chess player.

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blacktop wasteland

Flatiron Books | July 14, 2020 | 9781250252685

"The gritty, brutal narrative is complemented by the author's sublime use of sensory description and regional imagery. In addition, the epic, jaw-dropping chase sequences that figure prominently are reason alone to read this pedal-to-the-metal but profoundly sorrowful novel. Cosby is definitely a writer to watch.
Publishers Weekly

"We're in Elmore Leonard land… Bug's got a conscience not typical of the thriller genre, but other than that, this novel recalls almost perfectly the classic heist thriller in the vein of Richard Stark's "Parker" novels. It'll go like hot cakes."
Library Journal, starred review

Cosby never misses a note in this high-energy read, from Bug's under-the-hood wizardry to the actual driving to the sensitive character building, which gives depth to the entire cast, including Bug's hapless yet treacherous associates. A superb work of crime fiction, uncompromisingly noir but deeply human, too, much like Lou Berney's November Road.
ALA Booklist, starred review

Beauregard Montage knows how to fix any car—but that would be selling him short. He knows how to make an ordinary American car something that flies, something that, under his hands on the wheel, can take its driver places. He came to that knowledge through heritage, love and the lure of dangerous getaways. But he is in a town that has no call for those skills.

He's got a repair shop that is floundering, a wife and two sons, a daughter from an earlier time, and the car he inherited from his father, a Plymouth Duster. Late at night, when he races the car ten miles out from the fairgrounds in the back road illegal races, he feels most like himself. He feels reconnected to the part of him that has no part in this other life he knows he needs to live for the people he loves. It's always there though, just below the surface, that desire for one more getaway drive, one more adrenaline boosting race against the cops.

The Secrets We Kept
laura prescott

lara prescott

thursday, JUly 30 / 7:00 PM

Lara Prescott received her MFA from the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas, Austin. She was previously an animal protection advocate and a political campaign operative. Her stories have appeared in The Southern Review, The Hudson Review, Crazyhorse, Day One, and Tin House Flash Fridays. She won the 2016 Crazyhorse Fiction Prize for the first chapter of The Secrets We Kept. She lives in Austin, Texas.

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The Secrets We Kept

Paperback: Vintage | June 30, 2020 | 9780525566106

A thrilling tale of secretaries turned spies, of love and duty, and of sacrifice--inspired by the real-life CIA plot to infiltrate the hearts and minds of Soviet Russia with the greatest love story of the twentieth century: Doctor Zhivago.

At the height of the Cold War, two secretaries are pulled out of the typing pool at the CIA and given the assignment of a lifetime. Their mission: to smuggle Doctor Zhivago out of the USSR, where no one dare publish it, and help Pasternak's magnum opus make its way into print around the world. Glamorous Sally Forrester is a seasoned spy who has honed her gift for deceit all over the world--using her magnetism and charm to pry secrets out of powerful men. Irina is a novice and, under Sally's tutelage, quickly learns how to blend in, make drops, and invisibly ferry classified documents. The Secrets We Kept combines a legendary literary love story--the decades-long affair between Pasternak and his mistress and muse, Olga Ivinskaya, who inspired Zhivago's heroine, Lara--with a narrative about two women empowered to lead lives of extraordinary intrigue and risk. From Pasternak's country estate outside Moscow to the brutalities of the Gulag, from Washington, DC, to Paris and Milan, The Secrets We Kept captures a watershed moment in the history of literature--told with soaring emotional intensity and captivating historical detail. And at the center of this unforgettable debut is the powerful belief that a piece of art can change the world.

some go home
Odie Lindsey-photo credit Dana DeLoca
chanelle benz

odie lindsey

thursday, august 6 / 7:00 PM
SPECIAL EVENT!
Join Odie Lindsey in conversation with author Chanelle Benz.

Odie Lindsey is the author of We Come to Our Senses: Stories. He received an NEA-funded fellowship for veterans, holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is writer-in-residence at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Chanelle Benz has published work in Guernica, Granta.com, The New York Times, Electric Literature, The American Reader, Fence, and is the recipient of an O. Henry Prize. Her story collection The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead was published in 2017 by Ecco/HarperCollins. It was named a Best Book of 2017 by The San Francisco Chronicle and one of Electric Literature's 15 Best Short Story Collections of 2017. It was also shortlisted for the 2018 Saroyan Prize and longlisted for the 2018 PEN/Robert Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction and the 2017 Story Prize. Her novel The Gone Dead was published by Ecco/HarperCollins in 2019 and was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice and a Tonight Show Summer Reads Finalist. It was longlisted for the 2020 PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel and longlisted for the 2019 Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. It was also named a best new book of the summer by O, The Oprah Magazine, Time, Southern Living, and Nylon. She lives in Memphis where she teaches at Rhodes College.

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some go home

W.W. Norton Company | July 21, 2020 | 9780393249521

Some Go Home is a searing debut novel following three generations fractured by murder in fictional Pitchlynn, Mississippi that complicates notions of race, class, history, and identity.

Colleen—an Iraq war veteran turned Mississippi homemaker—must reckon with a decades-old murder that has haunted her community, her family, and herself. When pregnancy brings her buried trauma to the surface, Colleen works hard to keep her deployment behind her. Her husband, Derby, is in turn preoccupied with the long-overdue retrial of his father, Hare Hobbs, for a Civil Rights-era murder. Central to Some Go Home is the town's showpiece, antebellum estate. More monument than manor, it is both the scene of the murder and the proposed jewel of gentrified Pitchlynn. For Colleen and the others, all of whom seek healing, the estate comes to embody various paths to redemption—whether razed, restored to a perceived greatness, or stripped of all recognition. As the trial draws near, questions of Hare's guilt only magnify these tensions of class and race, tied always to the land and who can call it their own.

Informed by his work editing the Mississippi Encyclopedia, Lindsey's prose is insightful and wonderfully detailed, steeped in the same cultural history the characters are forced to confront in the book. Part literary saga and part cultural provocation, Some Go Home is a richly textured, explosive depiction of both the American South and our larger cultural legacy.

the yellow house
sarah m. broom
imani perry

sarah m. broom

thursday, august 13 / 7:00 PM
SPECIAL EVENT!
Sarah M. Broom in conversation with Imani Perry

Winner of the 2019 National Book Award in Nonfiction, Sarah M. Broom has also published her work in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Oxford American, and O, The Oprah Magazine, among others. A native New Orleanian, she earned her Masters in Journalism from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been awarded a Whiting Foundation Creative Nonfiction Grant, and fellowships at Djerassi Resident Artists Program and The MacDowell Colony. She lives in Harlem.

Imani Perry is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and a faculty associate with the Programs in Law and Public Affairs, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Jazz Studies. She is the author of 6 books, including Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry, which received the Pen Bograd-Weld Award for Biography, The Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Award for outstanding work in literary scholarship, the Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ Nonfiction and the Shilts-Grahn Award for nonfiction from the Publishing Triangle. Looking for Lorraine was also named a 2018 notable book by the New York Times, and an a honor book by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. It was a finalist  for the African American Intellectual History Society Paul Murray Book Prize. Her book May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem, winner of the 2019 American Studies Association John Hope Franklin Book Award for the best book in American Studies, the Hurston Wright Award for Nonfiction, and finalist for an NAACP Image Award in Nonfiction. Her most recent book is: Breathe: A Letter to My Sons (Beacon Press, 2019) which was a finalist for the 2020 Chautauqua Prize and a finalist for the NAACP Image Award for Excellence in Nonfiction.

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the yellow house

Paperback: Grove Press | June 30, 2020 | 9780802149039

Winner of the 2019 National Book Award in Nonfiction

A brilliant, haunting and unforgettable memoir from a stunning new talent about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.

In 1961, Sarah M. Broom's mother Ivory Mae bought a shotgun house in the then-promising neighborhood of New Orleans East and built her world inside of it. It was the height of the Space Race and the neighborhood was home to a major NASA plant—the postwar optimism seemed assured. Widowed, Ivory Mae remarried Sarah's father Simon Broom; their combined family would eventually number twelve children. But after Simon died, six months after Sarah's birth, the Yellow House would become Ivory Mae's thirteenth and most unruly child.

A book of great ambition, Sarah M. Broom's The Yellow House tells a hundred years of her family and their relationship to home in a neglected area of one of America's most mythologized cities. This is the story of a mother's struggle against a house's entropy, and that of a prodigal daughter who left home only to reckon with the pull that home exerts, even after the Yellow House was wiped off the map after Hurricane Katrina. The Yellow House expands the map of New Orleans to include the stories of its lesser known natives, guided deftly by one of its native daughters, to demonstrate how enduring drives of clan, pride, and familial love resist and defy erasure. Located in the gap between the "Big Easy" of tourist guides and the New Orleans in which Broom was raised, The Yellow House is a brilliant memoir of place, class, race, the seeping rot of inequality, and the internalized shame that often follows. It is a transformative, deeply moving story from an unparalleled new voice of startling clarity, authority, and power.


heather bell adams

heather bell adams

Thursday, August 27 / 7:00 PM

Heather Bell Adams is the author of the novels, Maranatha Road (West Virginia University Press 2017) and The Good Luck Stone (Haywire Books 2020). Maranatha Road won the gold medal for the Southeast region in the Independent Publisher Book Awards and was named to Deep South Magazine's Fall/Winter Reading List. The Good Luck Stone, which won the Grassic Short Novel Prize, appears on Deep South Magazine's Summer Reading List and Most Anticipated Small Press Novel Lists for The Big Other and BuzzFeed.

Heather's short fiction, which has won the Carrie McCray Memorial Literary Award and James Still Fiction Prize, appears in The Thomas Wolfe Review, Atticus Review, The Petigru Review, Pisgah Review, Pembroke Magazine, Broad River Review, and other journals.

Heather is originally from Hendersonville, North Carolina and now lives in Raleigh where she works as a lawyer. A nationally-recognized scholar on the works of Ron Rash, she also volunteers on the Raleigh Review fiction staff.

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The Good Luck Stone

Haywire Books | July 7, 2020 | 9781950182046

Her desperate decision during World War II changed everything. Now, 70 years later, her secret is unraveling.

At ninety years old, Audrey Thorpe still lives in a historic mansion on palm-tree-lined Victory Drive, determined to retain her independence. But when her health begins to fade, her family hires a part-time caregiver, Laurel. The two women seem to bond-until Audrey disappears. Unbeknownst to Laurel, Audrey has harbored a secret for 70 years, since her time as a nurse in the South Pacific during World War II.

As the story moves between the verdant jungles of the war-torn Philippines and the glitter of modern-day Savannah, Georgia, friendships new and old are tested. Along the way, Audrey grapples with one of life's heart-wrenching truths: You can only outrun your secrets for so long.